CFP: Computers and Writing Online 2006

November 4, 2005 in Calls

Computers and Writing Online 2006, “Making Knowledge on the Digital Frontier,” will be held February 6-28, 2006. This online conference complements the face-to-face Computers and Writing conference that will be held in May 2006 at Texas Tech University in Lubbock, Texas. Proposals are sought from both individuals and teams for 1-hour synchronous and asynchronous sessions as well as 45-minute poster sessions. Asynchronous sessions will occur over a five-day period between February 6 and 28. Poster sessions will take place on February 18 in the English MOO at Texas Tech.

Proposals are sought on a wide range of topics that address the theme of the conference. Topics may include but are not limited to:

–”New” technologies such as wikis and blogs in the writing classroom
–Reconsideration of past propositions about how computer networks are best suited for learning and writing instruction, as well as for online learning communities
–The sociology of digital communities
–The interface between Rhetoric and Composition theory and technology
–Technologies of Technical Communication: theory, practice, pedagogy
–Online portfolios: the state of the art
–Visual rhetoric and new media

250-word proposal abstracts are due November 30, 2005. For complete information on the conference and proposal submission instructions, visit the CWO conference website, or contact Conference Coordinator Lennie Irvin.

CFP: media-N Open Issue

November 3, 2005 in Calls

media-N, the international, peer-reviewed online journal of New Media Caucus, invites submissions for its next issue on any new media topic. In addition to essays, the editors are interested in commentaries, reviews, etc. The goal of this issue is to help define the scope of the journal and its readership. Also sought are guest editors with proposals for future themed issues. The deadline for the next issue is November 21, 2005. For submission instructions, visit the New Media Caucus on line.

Electronic Literature Collection — Call for Works

November 1, 2005 in Calls, ELO

The Electronic Literature Organization seeks submissions for the first Electronic Literature Collection. We invite the submission of literary works that take advantage of the capabilities and contexts provided by the computer. Works will be accepted until January 31, 2006. Up to three works per author will be considered.

The Electronic Literature Collection will be an annual publication of current and older electronic literature in a form suitable for individual, public library, and classroom use. The publication will be made available both online, where it will be available for download for free, and as a packaged, cross-platform CD-ROM, in a case appropriate for library processing, marking, and distribution. The contents of the Collection will be offered under a Creative Commons license so that libraries and educational institutions will be allowed to duplicate and install works and individuals will be free to share the disc with others.

The editorial collective for this first volume of the Electronic Literature Collection, to be published in 2006, is:

N. Katherine Hayles
Nick Montfort
Scott Rettberg
Stephanie Strickland

This collective will review the submitted work and select pieces for the Collection.

The editorial collectives for each volume will be chosen by the Electronic Literature Organization’s board of directors. The tentative editorial collective for the second Collection, to be published in 2007, includes Matthew G. Kirschenbaum, Marjorie C. Luesebrink, and Noah Wardrip-Fruin.

Literary quality will be the chief criterion for selection of works. Other aspects considered will include innovative use of electronic techniques, quality and navigability of interface, and adequate representation of the diverse forms of electronic literature in the collection as a whole.

For the first Collection, the collective will consider works up to 50 MB in size, uncompressed. Works submitted should function on both Macintosh OS X (10.4) and Windows XP. Works should function without requiring users to purchase or install additional software. Submissions may require software that is typically pre-installed on contemporary computers, such as a web browser, and are allowed to use the current versions of the most common plugins.

To have a work considered, all the authors of the work must agree that if their work is published in the Collection, they will license it under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.5 License, which will permit others to copy and freely redistribute the work, provided the work is attributed to its authors, that it is redistributed non-commercially, and that it is not used in the creation of derivative works. No other limitation is made regarding the author’s use of any work submitted or accepted.

To submit a work:

  1. Prepare a plain text file with the following information:
    • The title of the work.
    • The names and email addresses of all authors and contributors of the work.
    • The URL where you are going to make your .zip file available for us to download. The editorial collective will not publish the address of this file.
    • A short description of the work — less than 200 words in length.
    • Any instructions required to operate the work.
    • The date the work was first distributed or published, or “unpublished” if it has not yet been made available to the public.
  2. Prepare a .zip archive including the work in its entirety. Include the text file from step (1) at the top level of this archive, and name it “submisson.txt”.
  3. Upload the .zip file to a web server so that it is available at the specified location.
  4. Place all of the text in the “submisson.txt” file in the body of an email and send it to collection@eliterature.org with the name of the piece being submitted included in the subject line.

The Electronic Literature Collection is supported by institutional partners including the Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing (CPCW) at the University of Pennsylvania, ELINOR: Electronic Literature in the Nordic Countries, Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) at the University of Maryland, The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, and The School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Minnesota.

CFP: Special Issue of Convergence to Commemorate trAce’s 10th Anniversary

October 26, 2005 in Calls

Guest-editors Simon Mills, Gavin Stewart and Sue Thomas invite submissions to a special issue of Convergence: The International Journal of New Media Technologies, commemorating trAce’s 10th anniversary. The theme of the Winter 2006 issue will be “An End to the New? Re-Assessing the Claims for New Media Writing”. The editors seek essays that re-assess claims made for new media writing over the last decade; challenge the dominant ideologies and terminologies of the field; and provide a critical re-evaluation of new media writing in all its forms. The deadline for receipt of final drafts of papers is January 30, 2006. For the full call, contact Gavin Stewart.

CFP: iDMAa + IMS Conference “<code> HumanSystems / Digital Bodies”

October 24, 2005 in Calls

The International Digital Media and Arts Association and Miamai University’s Center for Interactive Media Studies invite paper submisssions to the 2006 iDMAa + IMS Conference, to be held April 6-8, 2006 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio.

The conference, which will include refereed paper panels, discussion workshops, gallery talks, and performances, will be organized around nine “tracks” addressing various aspects of code. For the complete call, visit the conference website. Submissions are due by November 23, 2005 to Peg FaimonM, program chair.

While visiting the iDMA site, check out the current issue of the iDMA journal, a special issue on game studies, featuring Espen Aarseth on “Game Studies: What is it good for?”

CFP: Digital Games and Learning

October 24, 2005 in Calls

There is still time to submit essays to Learning, Media and Technology’s special issue on “Digital Games and Learning”. The deadline for submissions has been extended to October 31, 2005. Guest editors Liam Murray and Cathlena Martin seek interdisciplinary contributions on any aspect of digital games and learning from early years to higher education, as well as in the home, the community, and the workplace, including:

–The role of edutainment in formal contexts
–Informal learning and digital games
–Young people as creators of digital games
–The impact of learning on multi-player digital games and online communities
–New pedagogies for integrating digital games within formal curricula
–Digital games and media literacy

For information on submission guidelines, contact Trish Gladdis at the Institute of Education, Manchester Metropolitan University.

Announcing Digital Humanities Quarterly: New Venue for Published E-Lit

October 21, 2005 in Calls

Announcing Digital Humanities Quarterly, a new open-access peer-reviewed journal sponsored by the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations and the Association for Computers and the Humanities. Below is the call for interactive media submissions. Please link and trackback to help us get the word out.

Call for Submissions (Interactive Media)

Digital Humanities Quarterly

Interactive Media submissions are invited for Digital Humanities Quarterly, a new open-access peer-reviewed online journal sponsored by the Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations and the Association for Computers and the Humanities. Submissions may be mailed to submissions@digitalhumanities.org. A web submission form will also be available soon.

We welcome material on all aspects of digital media in the humanities, and we encourage research creators to submit original interactive works for review. These works should be an original use of interactivity and design in educational, research, or creative communication. Suitable works could include (but are not limited to) original hypertext fiction, online educational applications or games, text analysis tools, interactive visualizations, streaming media work, and original interactive digital artwork.

We are also seeking articles representing original research in digital humanities, editorials, and reviews regarding any aspect of digital humanities (including humanities computing, new media, digital libraries, game studies, digital editing, pedagogy, hypertext and hypermedia, computational linguistics, markup theory, and related fields). A separate call for submissions will be posted for this area.

Submissions in all categories may be in traditional formats, or may be formally experimental. We welcome submissions that experiment with the rhetoric of the digital medium. We encourage the use of standards-based formats, but over time we will work to accommodate a wider range of media types and experimental functions.

All submissions will be peer reviewed.

For submission guidelines, please visit http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/guidelines/index.shtml. In particular, please note the requirements for the submissions of interactive media http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/guidelines/mediaGuidelines.shtml. For articles, please note the new DHQauthor schema, a TEI-based schema for authoring, available for download together with stylesheets and documentation at http://www.digitalhumanities.org/en//DHquarterly/DownloadCentral.

For further information, and to contact our editors, please visit http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/.

medi@terra Art and Technology Festival, Athens

October 19, 2005 in Calls

medi@terra, the 7th international art and technology festival of the Fournos Center for Digital Culture invites submissions of papers and games on this year’s theme, “Games and Reality”. The festival and conference will take place December 7-11, 2005, in Athens, Greece. The deadline for submission of games and game demos, as well as abstracts for the “Games or Reality: the Challenge of Digital Culture” conference portion of the festival is October 30, 2005. Visit mediaterra.org for the full call.

Call for Participation: Creative Versioning Project

October 2, 2005 in Calls, New E-Lit

Matthew Kirschenbaum is looking for poets and fiction writers willing to participate in a project to archive versions of texts in progress. An electronic document repository (known as a Concurrent Versions System, or CVS) will be used to track revisions and changes to original fiction and poetry contributed by participating writers who will work by checking their drafts in and out of the repository system. The goal is to provide access to a work at each and every state of its composition and conceptual evolution ­- thereby capturing the text as a living, dynamic object-in-the-making rather than a finished end-product. A reader will be able to watch the composition process unfold as though s/he were looking over the writer’s shoulder.

Participating writers must agree to:

* Work with your text exclusively within the confines of the CVS, checking it in and out each and every time you wish to edit or compose.

* Give their consent to make all archived versions of the work publicly accessible.

The result will be a Web-accessible archive, with the full text of each and every version of a writer’s text available for reading and relations between the versions expressed by means of maps and visualizations.

To participate, please contact Kirschenbaum at mgk =at= umd =dot= edu . Please indicate your willingness to abide by the above constraints.

Matthew Kirschenbaum
Assistant Professor of English
Acting Associate Director,
Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH)
301-405-8927 or 301-314-7111 (fax)

http://www.mith.umd.edu/

http://www.otal.umd.edu/~mgk/

[Note: At this point Kirschenbaum is recruiting interested writers. He is not sure when the project will actually get off the ground - hopefully this winter.]

ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships

September 7, 2005 in Calls

The ACLS announces the first annual competition for the ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships, thanks to the generous assistance of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. This program invites applications to pursue digitally based research projects in all disciplines of the humanities and humanities-related social sciences. It is hoped that projects of successful applicants will help advance digital humanistic scholarship by broadening understanding of its nature and exemplifying the robust infrastructure necessary for creating further such works.

ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships are intended to support an academic yeadedicated to work on a major scholarly project that takes a digital form. Projects might include but are not limited to: digital research archives, new media representations of extant data, innovative databases, and digital tools that further humanistic research. ACLS does not support creative works (e.g., novels or films), textbooks, straightforward translations, or purely pedagogical projects. The ACLS will award up to five ACLS Digital Innovation Fellowships in this competition year. Each fellowship carries a stipend of up to $55,000 towards an academic year¹s leave and provides for project costs of up to $25,000.

This year’s successful applicants may take up the fellowship in 2006-2007 or at any time up to September 1, 2007, but candidates must commit themselves firmly to their preferred timeframe on their completed applications.

Amount (for stipends): up to $55,000
Amount (for project costs): up to $25,000
Tenure: one academic year, plus institutional support for an additional
period.

Completed applications must be submitted through the ACLS Online Fellowship Application system (ofa.acls.org) no later than 9 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, November 10, 2005. Decisions will be announced in late March 2006.

More information: archive of: http://www.acls.org/difguide.htm

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