“Solarcon-6” published by Alt-X Online Network

The Alt-X Online Network, “where the digerati meet the literati,” announces the release of “Solarcon-6,” an ebook collection of stories by Wiley Wiggins. Wiggins’ “Solarcon-6” is the ninth ebook in the Alt-X Press series which features other titles by artists including Eugene Thacker, Mark Amerika, Adrienne Eisen, and Alan Sondheim.

Bill Seaman Wins 2002 Leonardo Award for Excellence

Bill Seaman, ELO Board Member, has been chosen as the recipient of the 2002 Leonardo Award for Excellence for his article, “OULIPO / VS / Recombinant Poetics” (Leonardo 34:5, 2001, Digital Salon Special Issue). In his article, Bill Seaman explores alternative avenues of creativity and redefines them through visual and sonic digital media. OULIPO, or the Ouvroir de littérature potentielle (the Workshop for Potential Literature), encourages writers to explore challenging ways of mixing words and letters in their work.

Bill Seaman is head of the Graduate Digital Media Program at Rhode Island School of Design, and is exploring issues related to the continuum between physical and virtual/media space.

The Impermanence Agent at the Whitney Museum’s Artport

The Impermanence Agent (by Noah Wardrip-Fruin, Adam Chapman, Brion Moss, Duane Whitehurst) began in 1998 as a storytelling Web agent that customized its texts and images based on monitoring of each reader’s Web browsing. Five years later, the project is turning inside out — rather than showing each individual a story customized for them, it now shows all visitors the stories altered by a few “featured browsers.” During the month of February 2003, the Agent’s story will be progressively altered for these browsers, with the results continually viewable, and at the end of the month, the final version will be archived on the Whitney Museum’s server. With this, the project’s weight shifts between individual experience and collective, between long-term customization and short-term surveillance, between impermanence and archiving. Most users now will never see the original story, but only the results of many browser-driven alterations.

Master Plan

“Le Musee di-visioniste,”an online museum based on a philosophical idea, and corporative member of New Media Art Project Network, launches new online showcase of net-based art works. Works by Daniel Young (USA), Patrick Simons/Kate Southworth (UK), jimpunk (France), Dan Norton, Scotland, and Nicolas Clauss (France).

Rich Gold, Digital Pioneer Die

Rich Gold of Menlo Park died in his sleep on January 9, 2003. Rich Gold was a digital artist, inventor, cartoonist, composer, lecturer and inter-disciplinary researcher who in the 1970s co-founded the League of Automatic Music Composers, the first network computer band. As an internationally known artist he invented the field of Algorithmic Symbolism. In the 1980s he was director of the sound and music department of Sega. From 1985 to 1990 he headed an electronic and computer toy research group at Mattel Toys and was the manager of the development of several interactive toys, including the Mattel PowerGlove. After working as a consultant in VirtualReality he joined Xerox PARC in 1991, where he was a scientific researcher in Ubiquitous Computing, the study of invisible, embedded and tacit computation. In 1993 he founded the influential PARC Artist-In-Residence program (PAIR),in which fine artists and scientists collaborated using shared technologies. Later that year, he created the multi-disciplinary Laboratory RED (Research in Experimental Documents) which studied the creation of new document genres by merging art, design, science and engineering and then creating exemplars of those genres.

New Book Reviews in Cyberculture Studie

New to the site are the following reviews: Charles Ess & Fay Sudweeks, eds, Culture, Technology, Communication: Towards an Intercultural Global Village (SUNY Press, 2001) Reviewed by Michel J. Menou, with a response from Charles Ess and Fay Sudweeks; James E. Katz & Mark Aakhus, eds, Perpetual Contact: Mobile Communication, Private Talk, Public Performance (Cambridge University Press, 2002) Reviewed by Tim Detwiler, Scott Campbell, and Wendy Robinson, with a response from Mark Aakhus and James E. Katz.

New E-Lit Creative Writing Fellowship Offered at Brown

Robert Coover writes:
When the award-winning digital artist Talan Memmott went to the Graduate Program in Creative Writing at Brown University this fall as an MFA candidate in electronic writing, something new was happening. He followed upon such previous e-lit luminaries as Bobby Arellano, Shelley Jackson, Mary Kim Arnold, Mark Amerika, Matt Derby, Judd Morrissey, and Noah Wardrip-Fruin, but all of these writers were accepted as graduate fiction writers, not electronic writers. And now the unique fellowship awarded to Memmott has been converted into a permanent annual Creative Writing graduate fellowship in electronic writing, perhaps the first of its kind in the world (any challenges?). It offers tuition and a stipend, partly earned in the second year by teaching workshops, which in the case of those holding this new fellowship will be electronic writing courses, thereby expanding the university’s course offerings in the digital arts. Applicants should follow the existing Creative Writing guidelines, applying to the genre of choice (fiction, poetry, or playwriting) with a clear indication of interest in the digital field. Although there is only one such fellowship at this time, it is hoped that other electronic writers might, through the quality of their writing, be accepted within the traditional genres, thus augmenting the digital community here. In addition to providing print writing samples in one of the three genres (the electronic fellowship is not genre-specific), applicants should submit examples (or documentation) of their electronic writing by way of DVD, CD-ROM, videotape, or web address (URL).

New E-Lit Creative Writing Fellowship Offered at Brown

Robert Coover writes:
When the award-winning digital artist Talan Memmott went to the Graduate Program in Creative Writing at Brown University this fall as an MFA candidate in electronic writing, something new was happening. He followed upon such previous e-lit luminaries as Bobby Arellano, Shelley Jackson, Mary Kim Arnold, Mark Amerika, Matt Derby, Judd Morrissey, and Noah Wardrip-Fruin, but all of these writers were accepted as graduate fiction writers, not electronic writers. And now the unique fellowship awarded to Memmott has been converted into a permanent annual Creative Writing graduate fellowship in electronic writing, perhaps the first of its kind in the world (any challenges?). It offers tuition and a stipend, partly earned in the second year by teaching workshops, which in the case of those holding this new fellowship will be electronic writing courses, thereby expanding the university’s course offerings in the digital arts. Applicants should follow the existing Creative Writing guidelines, applying to the genre of choice (fiction, poetry, or playwriting) with a clear indication of interest in the digital field. Although there is only one such fellowship at this time, it is hoped that other electronic writers might, through the quality of their writing, be accepted within the traditional genres, thus augmenting the digital community here. In addition to providing print writing samples in one of the three genres (the electronic fellowship is not genre-specific), applicants should submit examples (or documentation) of their electronic writing by way of DVD, CD-ROM, videotape, or web address (URL).