Launching The Electronic Literature Collection, vol. 3

Screenshot of ELC3

Electronic Literature Collection, vol. 3

Announcing the publication of the Electronic Literature Collection Volume 3, which launched today at an event at the Stedman Art Gallery at Rutgers University, Camden. This third volume features 114 works from 26 countries in 13 languages. The latest collection, drawn from over 500 submitted and solicited works, represents a wide range of forms and styles, including poem generators, bots, interactive fiction, mobile apps, and more.

According to co-editor Anastasia Salter, “With the ELC3, we saw an opportunity to expand the common definitions of electronic literature to embrace new frontiers in mobile, gaming, and experimental art produced by communities working outside of traditional academic and literary spaces.”

The features works languages include: Arabic, Dutch, English, French, German, Japanese, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, Norwegian, and Swedish. These innovative works hail from Brazil, Canada, Colombia, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Iran, Ireland, Israel, Japan, Korea, Mexico, Netherlands, Norway, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, the UK, and the United States.

As a snapshot of the field in this moment, the collection is designed to feature new and established voices in handcrafted HTML or computer-generated verse.  The works feature stunning visuals, engaging interaction, and immersive environs, stretching the boundaries of the possible for literary endeavors.

ELC3 was edited by Stephanie Boluk, Leonardo Flores, Jacob Garbe, and Anastasia Salter with the assistance of an international advisory board.

This evening’s event at Rutgers-Camden marks the publication of the online version.  The physical copy (on a USB drive) will be released at our international conference in Victoria this summer.

See all three of the collections here:

4Humanities “Shout Out for the Humanities” Contest

“Shout Out for the Humanities” Contest


Your submission to this contest should answer such questions as: Why is studying the humanities–e.g., history, literature, languages, philosophy, art history, media history, and culture–important to you? To society? How would you convince your parents, an employer, a politician, or others that there is value in learning the humanities?

Who: Enter if you are an undergraduate or graduate student, an individual or team, from any nation.

What: Your submission will be judged by an international panel of distinguished judges for message, quality, and impact no matter your medium or format. Possible submissions include: essay (less than 2,000 words), video, digital work, poster, cartoon, song, art, short story, interview. See our Contest Kit for ideas, resources, and tools.

*Special note for digital artists: the contest encourages submissions in any format or medium, including digital or online ones.

Instructors and Educational Leaders: Want to organize a “creativity workshop” to incubate submissions by your students? See Workshops and Contest Kit for ideas. will create an online showcase specifically for your students’ work.

When: Submissions by March 1, 2016.

Prizes: Winners will receive the following awards, and will be published on the site:

  • Undergraduate Students: 1st US$1,000 — 2nd US$700 — 3rd US$300
  • Graduate Students: 1st US$1,000 — 2nd US$700 — 3rd US$300

– See more at: