MELLON FOUNDATION FUNDS ARCHIVING PROJECT AT WSUV ELECTRONIC LITERATURE LAB

News Release from WSU Vancouver
Posted on FlashAlert: June 1st, 2018 1:29 PM

VANCOUVER, Wash. — The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded $42,000 to migrate the Electronic Literature Organization’s (ELO) archives to an open-source repository system that ensures their preservation and public accessibility. Much of the archiving and documentation will take place at WSU Vancouver’s Electronic Literature Lab, under the leadership of Professor Dene Grigar, director of the lab.

WSU Vancouver is the current sponsoring institution for the ELO, and Grigar is its president. The university also is a partner in the project, titled “A Comprehensive Online Portal for Electronic Literature Works.” Other partners are the ELO, the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab at the University of Victoria (Canada) and Compute Canada.

Nicholas Schiller, WSU Vancouver librarian and associate director of the Electronic Literature Lab, will also participate as Co-PI. In addition, the project involves scholars from two other institutions who also serve as Co-PIs: Leonardo Flores, professor at the University of Puerto Rico Mayagüez, and Abby Adams, digital archivist at the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin. Student research assistants at WSU Vancouver will also help.

The ELO’s digital archives consist of seven collections of original digital literature––typically referred to as electronic literature, or e-lit. The project addresses the need for improved access, discovery and preservation for these works so that they will be available to scholars of the present and future.

About WSU Vancouver

As one of six campuses of the Washington State University system, WSU Vancouver offers big-school resources in a small-school environment. The university provides affordable, high-quality baccalaureate- and graduate-level education to benefit the people and communities it serves. As the only four-year research university in Southwest Washington, WSU Vancouver helps drive economic growth through relationships with local businesses and industries, schools and nonprofit organizations. 

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Contact Info:
Dene Grigar, 360-546-9487, dgrigar [at] wsu dot edu
Nicholas Schiller, 360-546-9171, schiller [at] wsu dot edu
Brenda Alling, Office of Marketing and Communications, 360-546-9601, brenda_alling [at] wsu dot edu

Arabic E-Lit Conference in Dubai (Feb 25-27) Commences

The first (to our knowledge) electronic literature conference in Dubai has commenced.  Hosted at RIT in Dubai, the conference was organized by Babak Elahi, Reham Hosny, and Patrick Lichty, Jonathon Penny.  Under the patronage of H. E. Lt General Dahi Khalfan Tamim, deputy chief of police and public security in Dubai.  ELO is proud to be a partner of this first-time event, continuing the spread of electronic literature around the world.

Arabic E-Lit Conference Webpage

Along with presentations and a gallery, the conference includes workshop called “Hacking Electronic Literature” by Hosny, Dene Grigar, and John Barber.  Featured keynote speakers are Katherine Hayles, Zohor Gourram, and Karim Sultan.

Follow the conference hashtag: #arbicelit.

See the full conference program and more here:
https://www.arabic-elit.org/schedule

Below is the full conference program:

Read more Arabic E-Lit Conference in Dubai (Feb 25-27) Commences

CFP: Multilingual Digital Authorship (3/8-9;2/2/18)

Multilingual Digital Authorship
Lancaster University, 8-9 March 2018

The inaugural symposium of The Creative Web of Languages (MEITS flexible funding project) 

Call for Papers

The World Wide Web is commonly perceived the ultimate tool of homogenizing culture through dominant platforms such as Google and Facebook and consequently as the major culprit in the loss of ground of local cultures. Digital cultures are in reality plural, however, in terms of both form and language, and they not only continue pre-digital traditions through new modes of expression and in a new space for creativity in specific languages, but also invite us to rethink the nature and role of cultural heritage, language, identity, and their relationships today. At the same time, the web remains a fluid and open space that allows for the mixing and cross-fertilization of cultures more than any other previous mode of interaction. Artists and authors who engage in digital creativity often live in and between different cultures and languages that feed into their works; they translate their own or others’ works; engage with audiences across cultures; and are critical of dominant platforms and discourses, which they often hijack. The digital has never been neutral, as Alexandra Saemmer notes, and creatively engaging with it entails questioning established modes of thinking and writing as well as the relationship between language, tradition, and identity. The work of multilingual authors and artists such as Gregory Chatonsky, Alexandra Saemmer, Serge Bouchardon, Canan Marasligil, Lou Sarabadzic, María Mencía, Guillaume Vissac, or Belén Gache, to mention only a few, well illustrate the centrality of these concerns to born digital literature across languages. The importance of the linguistic identity and hybridity of electronic literature is still largely unexplored, however.

This symposium will be the inaugural event of The Creative Web of Languages, a two-year project addressing these questions, funded by the ‘Multilingualism: Empowering Individuals, Transforming Societies’ AHRC Open World Research Initiative (www.meits.org). The project aims to bring together researchers and artists across languages and specialisms to enable a rich dialogue and a comparative approach. The symposium benefits from additional support from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences and the Department of Languages and Cultures of Lancaster University, and will happen in partnership with the Electronic Literature Organization (https://eliterature.org/).

Confirmed speakers:

Serge Bouchardon; Canan Marasligil; María Mencía; Alexandra Saemmer; Lou Sarabadzic; Claire Larsonneur (Paris 8); Emanuela Patti (Royal Holloway); Claire Taylor (Liverpool University)

200-word proposals for 20-minute papers are invited on digital authors and creative works with a focus on the role of language and languages. Contributions discussing ongoing or completed web-based projects, including blogs, vlogs, microblogs, or social media experiments are particularly welcome. Topics may include, but need not be limited to:

  • The coexistence or mixing of languages and cultures in digital works and projects
  • Linguistic and cultural identity in and through digital creativity
  • Creative web-based communities across languages
  • Linguistic border crossing in digital works and projects
  • Translation and self-translation of digital works
  • The creative web and the politics of language / language and the politics of the creative web

Postgraduate students and early career scholars are particularly encouraged to submit proposals. Two small bursaries for postgraduate speakers will be available to help with the travel and accommodation costs.

Please send your proposal by Friday the 2nd of February to the organizer, Erika Fülöp at e.fulop@lancaster.ac.uk.

ELO at Baby Castles Jan 4

BABYCASTLES

Jan 4, 2018, 8pm

Baby Castles Reading Image

Join the Electronic Literature Organization at an evening of readings and performances at Babycastles, located at 145 W. 14th St., NY, NY

The event takes place on Thursday, January 4, from 8-10 p.m. It is free and open to the public.

Featured Artists and Works Performed:

  • Nick Montfort, “The Truelist”
  • Stephanie Strickland, “Hours of the Night”
  • Andrew Demirijian, ‘Pan-Terrestrial People’s Anthem’.
  • Laura Zaylea, “Style Guide for Erasing Human Dignity”
  • Alan Sondheim, “Splatter”
  • Kyle Booten, “Gymnasion”
  • Bill Bly, We Descend, Volume 3

 

Nick Montfort, “The Truelist”

Nick Montfort’s computer-generated books of poetry include #!, the collaboration 2×6, Autopia, and The Truelist, the first in the new Using Electricity series from Counterpath. Among his more than fifty digital projects are the collaborations The Deletionist, Sea and Spar Between, and Renderings. His digital artwork was shown this summer at Babycastles in New York and in Boston City Hall. He has six books out from the MIT Press, most recently The Future (in the Essential Knowledge series). He is professor of digital media at MIT and lives in New York and Boston. You can find this with all the italics in place here: http://nickm.com/me.html#summary

Stephanie Strickland, “Hours of the Night”
Stephanie Strickland has published 8 books of poetry, most recently Dragon Logic and V: WaveTercets / Losing L’una, and 11 works of electronic literature. Zone : Zero, book + CD, includes the poem slippingglimpse which maps text to Atlantic wave patterns. Recent digital poems include House of Trust with Ian Hatcher and Hours of the Night with M.D. Coverley. A volume of  New & Selected is forthcoming in early 2019. http://stephaniestrickland.com

Andrew Demirijian, “Pan-Terrestrial People’s Anthem”
Andrew Demirjian is an interdisciplinary artist who creates experimental assemblages of image, sound and text. His practice features a heightened attention to the role of sound and language and uses constraint systems, chance operations and remixing to produce the work. The pieces take the form of interactive installations, digital poems and audiovisual performances. Andrew’s work has been exhibited at The Museum of the Moving Image, Fridman Gallery, The Newark Museum, Eyebeam, Rush Arts, Fieldgate Gallery, the Center for Book Arts, LMAK Projects and many other galleries, festivals and museums. The MacDowell Colony, Puffin Foundation, Artslink, Harvestworks, Clocktower Gallery, Bemis Center, LMCC and the New Jersey State Council on the Arts are among some of the organizations that have supported his work. Andrew teaches theory and production courses in emerging media in the Film and Media Department and Integrated Media Arts MFA program at Hunter College. In 2018 he will be a Fellow at the MIT Open Documentary Lab working on a language analysis and visualization project.

Laura Zaylea, “Style Guide for Erasing Human Dignity”

Laura Zaylea is a media artist and Assistant Professor at Temple University in Philadelphia. Recent e-lit works include the web-based multimedia novel Closer Than Rustand the “locative romance” and grammar guide Speak2MeInCode. She is currently working on an interactive documentary about LGBTQ families, which can be found at www.LGBTQ-family.com. Laura holds a BA from Brown University and MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. More about her creative work can be found at www.LauraZaylea.com. Closer Than Rust – https://laurazaylea.com/creative-work/ctr/. Speak2MeInCode – https://speak2meincode.com/.

Alan Sondheim, “Splatter”
Alan Sondheim is a city-based new media artist, musician, writer, and performer concerned with issues of virtuality, and the stake that the real world has in the virtual. He has worked with his partner Azure Carter among others. Sondheim is interested in examining the grounds of the virtual and how the body isinhabited. He performs in virtual, real, and cross-over worlds; his virtual work is known for its highly complex and mobile architectures. He has used altered motion-capture technology extensively for examining and creating new lexicons of behavior. His current work is centered around notions of gamespace, ‘edgespace’ (the border areas of gamespace) and ‘blankness,’ projections around edgespace. He’s been developing a theory of semiotic splatter / splatter semiotics, dealing with fast-forward literatures of twitter, politics, 4chan, facebook, etc. His writing stems out of codework, a problematic style in which code substrates and surface content interfere with each other – in which, in other words, the textual body and body of text are deeply entangled.  His current music is based on the impossibility of time reversal, on fast improvisation, and anti-gestural approaches to playing. His most recent work is this short biography.

 

Kyle Booten, “Gymnasion”
Kyle Booten is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Neukom Institute for Computational Science at Dartmouth College.  His recent work has appeared or is forthcoming inFenceWestern Humanities ReviewPoor Claudiaand the proceedings of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics. He holds a PhD from UC Berkeley and an MFA from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.  You can see his website at https://kylebooten.me.

Bill Bly, We Descend, Volume 3
Bill Bly is the author of We Descend, an ongoing hypertext archive of writings begun in the 1980s with a fountain pen on notebook paper jammed in a clipboard: Volume One came out on floppy disk; Volume Two is on the web; Volume Three is under development. He has won the Stanley Drama Award and (with John McDaid) the John Culkin Award for Outstanding Praxis in Media Ecology. Bill was a founding member of the Hypertext Writers Workshop, and served as recorder for the legendary Cybermountain Colloquium. He has taught hypertext theory and practice at New York University and Fordham University, and was Director of Writing Programs at Wagner College. He lives in Mexico.

The emcee for the evening is Dene Grigar, a curator, e-lit artist, and digital preservationist from the Creative Media & Digital Culture Program at Washington State University Vancouver. She directs the Electronic Literature Lab and is President of the Electronic Literature Organization.

 

 

Sponsors include the ELO, Babycastles, & Washington State University Vancouver.

ELO Board Welcomes Astrid Ensslin

The ELO Board is proud to welcome its newest member, Astrid Ensslin.  Astrid has distinguished herself with her scholarship on electronic literature, including video games and children’s e-lit.  She is a professor of Digital Humanities and Game Studies at the University of Alberta and has published extensively in our field.  Among her many contributions to ELO, she co-curated the e-lit for kids exhibit in Porto. We are grateful to have her experience and talents.
 Below is her bio:
Astrid Ensslin is Professor in Digital Humanities and Game Studies at the University of Alberta. She has a PhD (s.c.l.) from Heidelberg University, and previously held academic and managerial faculty, research, and teaching positions at the Universities of Wales (Bangor), Manchester, and Leeds. Her main publications include Literary Gaming (MIT Press 2014), Analyzing Digital Fiction (Routledge, 2013),The Language of Gaming (Palgrave, 2011), Creating Second Lives: Community, Identity and Spatiality as Constructions of the Virtual (Routledge, 2011), Canonizing Hypertext: Explorations and Constructions (Bloomsbury, 2007), and Language in the Media: Representations, Identities, Ideologies (Bloomsbury, 2007). She is Principal Editor of the Journal of Gaming and Virtual Worlds and has led various government and charity funded projects, for example on researching and teaching videogames across cultures; empirical digital fiction reader-response research and curating digital fictions for broad audiences (AHRC “Reading Digital Fiction” project), analyzing digital fictions (Leverhulme Digital Fiction International Network), specialized language corpora, and training graduate students in digital humanities tools and methods.
ELO has a volunteer Board who serve for renewable three-year terms.  See members and bios here: http://eliterature.org/people/
Posted in

CALL FOR PAPERS – ELO 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS – ELO 2018
Mind the Gap!
Thinking Electronic Literature in a Digital Culture:
Explorations and Interventions
http://elo2018.org/

The Electronic Literature Organization (ELO) is pleased to announce its 2018 Conference and Festival, hosted by the Université du Québec à Montréal. The Conference, the Festival and Exhibits will be held August 13th to 17th in downtown Montréal, Québec, Canada. Mind the Gap! will be bilingual, with both English and French tracks, showcasing Montreal’s important and dynamic local Québécois e-lit/digital arts community and extending a special welcome to e-lit’s global francophonie.

The aim of this conference is to think about e-lit in a digital culture. What is its relationship to current cultural practices and trends? Two directions are proposed: explorations and interventions. The first direction features e-lit’s exploratory nature, its formal aspects, its use of technology, its renewal of narrative conventions, and at the same time its impact on literary theories and methodologies to renew themselves. The second direction considers e-lit’s place in the public sphere, its relationship to digital and urban culture, to forms of conservation and presentation, and also to performance.

TOPICS

Possible topics for presentations, performances and exhibits are:

Gaps in the field
Translation gaps: code, natural language, media
Narrative theory, temporal gaps and the imaginative space of the in-between
Understanding e-lit: towards digital methodologies and/or pedagogies
Mobile technologies’ effect on writing and reading habits
Perceptual gaps: AR, VR, and Linking Structures
Politics of e-lit: gaps between reception communities
Gaps and Bridges between e-lit and digital humanities
Gender gaps in e-lit
Spoken screens: the gap between performance and presence
Linguistic and cultural specificities to E-lit
Electronic literature and urban culture
Mind the gap! E-lit and humour
Gaps between datasets and interfaces
Archiving differences between libraries and museums
Exhibition differences: ephemeral and permanent installations
What is different about e-lit for children?

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

For the Conference (peer-reviewed):

Paper (15 min – a presentation of a single paper by one or more authors – 500 word abstract).
Lightning talk (5 min – a short paper for a focused presentation – 250 word abstract).
Poster (1 page poster). n.b. A poster can be combined with a lightning talk.
Panel (90 min – a proposal for a complete panel including 3 or 4 separate papers on the same general topic – 250 word overview plus 500 word individual abstracts).
Pre-conference Workshop (Action sessions, focused on hands-on group work on a given project or topic – 500 word abstract).
For the Festival (peer-reviewed):

Performance and screening (10 min – readings, actions, interventions – 250 word abstract; provide links to images, videos, etc.)
Gallery exhibit (provide description of installation, as well as technical needs)

Submissions open: October 16th, 2017 to December 15th, 2017.

Acceptances sent out: January 30th, 2018.

You must attend the conference to appear on the program. You may submit as many proposals as you want, but participants may present a maximum of two pieces/papers.

Registration: Early registration will close April 30st, 2018. There will be a registration fee for the Conference (to be determined), which will include ELO Membership, invitations to all sessions of the Conference, the Festival, and the Exhibits. Lunch and coffee-breaks will be served. Conference banquet requires an additional fee.

The conference will be hosted by the University du Québec à Montréal, at the Berri-UQAM subway station. The campus is fully wheelchair accessible. ELO 2018 is committed to making its conference accessible and will provide a simple accessibility guide to all venues.

Some of the sessions will be streamed via the Conference website.

For more information, contact Bertrand Gervais, ELO 2018 Chair, elo2018mtl (at) gmail.com

Announcing the 2017 ELO Prize Winners

 Announcing International Awards in Electronic Literature: 

The 2017 ELO Prize

— Porto Portugal

Literature is changing right in front of our eyes, and this year’s awards from the Electronic Literature Organization celebrate artists and scholars who are at the vanguard.

At the annual conference of the Electronic Literature Organization (ELO), held this year in Porto, Portugal, President Dene Grigar announced the 2017 ELO Prize winners: Alan Bigelow, John Cayley, and David Jhave Johnston for transformative work in the field of digital literature.   Second place winners include María Mencía, Mez Breeze and Andy Campbell, and shortlisted authors include Serge Bouchardon, JR Carpenter, Judy Malloy, Anastasia Salter.

Read more Announcing the 2017 ELO Prize Winners

Research Opportunities at the ELD

Announcing opportunities to contribute to one of ELO’s major projects is the Electronic Literature Directory (ELD). (http://directory.eliterature.org/)

The Electronic Literature Directory (ELD 2.0) is a collection of literary works, descriptions, and keywords. Both a repository of works and a critical companion to e-literature, the ELD hosts discussions that are capable of being referenced and revised over years of use, and the ELD feed directly into ELO’s larger CELL project (http://cellproject.net/).

The ELD is looking for 3 Associate Editors and for entries for the Electronic Literature Directory.

Why is contributing to the ELD so important?
You help expand the field of electronic literature.
You help other scholars and curators putting together classes and exhibits.
You help yourself by making your scholarship available in an open-access peer-reviewed platform opportunity.

Consider submitting entries to the ELD or applying for these positions.

Deadline for applications March 17, 2017
Apply and Submit via: eliterature.org at gmail.com.

Read more Research Opportunities at the ELD

MLA 2017 Readings & Performances

Join the Electronic Literature Organization for an evening of readings & performances during the Modern Language Association conference in Philadelphia, PA. The event takes place in the Connelly Auditorium (room 806) in the Terra Building at The University of the Arts, on January 5, 2017, from 8-10 p.m.

Dene Grigar and Jennifer Zaylea, Emcees

Performers and Works:

Sandy Baldwin & Gabriel Tremblay-Gaudette, “Poems you should know”

Daniel Anderson, “A Blessing” and “The Red Wheelbarrow”

Kathi Inman Berens, “Abaya”

Helen Burgess, “Anna, Autopoietic”

Caitlin Fisher, “Pareidolia: the Doll Universe”

Riham Hosny, “Salome,” by Mohamed Abdelghani (Yuzerssif)

Anastasia Salter and Bridget Blodgett, “Alt-Right: Ctrl+A; Del”

Liz Losh, “While Chopping Red Peppers” and “The Last Day of Betty Nkomo”

Laura Zaylea,  ”Closer than Rust”

The ELO would like to thank our hosts at The University of the Arts, and in particular Jennifer Zaylea for organizing this event.

UArtsLogo_color_side

 

Launching ELC3

ELC3 2.0

 

ELC3 cover

We are pleased to announce the 2.0 version of the Electronic Literature Collection, Volume 3 (ELC3). This version adds preservation and new resources to the 114 featured works. Here are four new features that should be of special interest to our community.

  • The works are now hosted in ELO servers (whenever possible), but we also link directly to their original websites to offer access to their authorial contexts. You can access both, as well as video documentation, through the Begin menu.

  • Downloadable, editable source files and other materials provided by the authors are now included in a new section titled Downloads, beneath the Editorial Statements for each work. You can study these materials from a variety of critical or creative approaches or remix them to create your own.

  • Twitter bots now have archives which allow you to browse, search, and read deeply into their output, from their launch up to January 2016. You can access them through the Begin menu or download them as spreadsheets in the Downloads section.

  • A downloadable version of the ELC3 will soon be available for those who wish to install it in classrooms, labs, or have an offline copy.

We are still fundraising to offer a USB version free to ELO members, sponsors, and to distribute to libraries, museums, and archives. If you are interested in contributing to this free and open ELO initiative, contact us at elcvol3@gmail.com.

The Electronic Literature Collection is one of ELO’s many initiatives to promote and preserve digital literature.  Your membership helps to fund these projects.  Join or renew your membership today or increase your membership level to enable ELO to continue to increase and spread information about this innovative mode of art.  https://eliterature.org/membership/

Slip Case for ELC3

Share and enjoy!

The ELC3 Editorial Collective

  • Stephanie Boluk

  • Leonardo Flores

  • Jacob Garbe

  • Anastasia Salter