CFP: Collection– From A to <A> :Keywords in HTML and Writing

From A to <A>Keywords in HTML and Writing, a proposed collection edited by Bradley Dilger and Jeff Rice, seeks essays that consider the cultural, ideological, and rhetorical forces shaping the relationships between writing and the mark-up and scripting languages that make up the web, such as HTML and CSS.

Markup tags will be used as keywords. Following the keywords genre, essays should focus on a single tag or unit of markup, and break down that tag’s etymological, historical, social, and cultural meanings.

For further details on the kinds of essays sought, as well as submission instructions, contact Bradley Dilger or Jeff Rice. A list of essays which have already been accepted is available online.

Deadline for abstracts is August 1, 2006.

CFP: IDMAa Journal Issue on History and Changing Paradigms: The Role of Digital Media and Arts in How We View Our World

The Journal of the International Digital Media and Arts Association (IDMAa) seeks submissions for a special issue on history and digital media. The journal is looking for “work that considers how digital media and arts have been contributing to changes in the ways that people see their world, both literally, and conceptually, with a particular emphasis on the ‘idea’ of History.”

The journal is published online as a PDF document, with an annual print version. Contributors are encouraged to consider formats that best suit the author’s goals:

–traditional peer-reviewed research article;

–commentary and criticism, including interviews, opinion pieces, editorials; reviews of books, articles and digital media artworks, etc.; as well as shorter academic and scholarly articles.

Jointly-authored submissions will be considered.

Submission deadline for this issue is August 1, 2006. For details on submission requirements, visit the IDMAa Journal.

CFW: Vectors–Perception, Difference, Memory

Vectors Journal of Culture and Technology in a Dynamic Vernacular seeks “richly multimedia submissions” on the themes of perception, difference, and memory. Accepted projects will be published over the next several years, depending on the topic. See Vectors for details and specifics on deadlines.

Also, Vectors Spring 2006, Ephemera, is now online. This issue features “a range of projects related to the theme of ephemera, from the perspectives of history, anthropology, cultural geography, film, media studies, video games, tourism, politics, art and literature. Contributors include Rick Prelinger, Judith Jackson Fossett, Amelie Hastie, Melanie Swalwell, Jeffrey Schnapp, Kim Christen, Chris Cooney, the Center for History and New Media and the Transcriptions Project at UC Santa Barbara.

new forms review invites submissions to the Where We Create Project

The newly-built new forms review, a net art and digital literature portal/future peer-reviewed journal founded by Jason Nelson, invites submissions to its first major initiative, the Where we Create Project.

The Where We Create Project “is designed,” says Nelson, “to connect digital artists and writers (and analog creators as well) through a website featuring photos and descriptions of where artists/writers create. Our geographies and external landscapes are instrumental in altering and forming the creatures we create.”

To contribute to the project, send the following to Where We Create:

1. An image or two, 300 pixels X 300 pixels jpg, of where you create. This could be your office, your backyard, some coffee shop–whatever image depicts the physical space(s) where you work;

2. Some text about the place and its meaning to you, your work, your life, or whatever you feel represents the world in which you create; five to seven sentences maximum;

3. Your name, any other brief biographical information, and where the places you are talking about are geographically located;

4. A few urls so people can see the work you create in that place.

New Reviews in Cyberculture Studies for May 2006

Washington University’s Resource Center for Cyberculture Studies (RCCS) presents three new book reviews this month:

Basque Cyberculture: From Digital Euskadi to Cybereuskalherria (University of Nevada: Center for Basque Studies, 2006), Andoni Alonso and Inaki Arzoz, reviewed by Loykie Lomine, with a response from Andoni Alonso;

Biomedia (University of Minnesota Press, 2004), Eugene Thacker, reviewed by Pramod K. Nayar, with a response from Eugene Thacker;

Applied Ethics in Internet Research (Trondheim, Norway: NTNU University Press, 2003), May Thorseth, editor, reviewed by Ted M. Coopman.

Open Workshop on Creative Writing and New Media, De Montfort University, Leicester

On Friday, June 23rd, De Montfort University will host a free “Open Workshop on Creative Writing and New Media”, featuring presentations by Randy Adams, editor and visual consultant for “trAces: A Commemoration of Ten Years of Artistic Innovation at trAce”; and Sue Thomas, De Montfort University professor of New Media, on the future of digital writing in a changing media environment.

Workshops throughout the day will include:

–Jess Laccetti, DMU researcher in new media texts: “Encounters with Web Fiction”

–Helen Whitehead, Kids on the Net: “The Digital Playground: Writing with and for Children”

–Keith Jebb, University of Luton lecturer in Creative Writing: “Wikis and the Workshop”

–Kate Pullinger, print and new media author, and DMU research fellow: “Writing New Media Fiction”

To register, visit DMU’s Narrative Lab and enter your email address in the right-hand column. Attendance is free but space is limited.

New Issue of ebr: Electronic Book Review

In this issue of ebr, the “waves” thread features essays on “Feminisms: Post, Past, and Present,” introduced by Elizabeth Joyce.

The “critical ecologies” thread includes a review of Lawrence Lessig’s Free Culture and Our Public Needs.

In “end construction,” another response to Lori Emerson’s November 2005 review of Walter Benn Michaels.

“electropoetics” offers Luc Herman and Bart Vervaeck on “Marie Laure-Ryan, Narrative as Virtual Reality”.

Plus reviews of new electronic fictions “Man in the Stretcher,” by Kenneth Bernard, and “Charlie P” by Dick Kalich.

Dartmouth College Endowed Chair in Digital Humanities

Dartmouth College is pleased to announce the creation of a senior position in the Digital Humanities for a newly endowed Chair in innovative fields. The successful applicant should be committed to inter-disciplinary collaboration, technological innovation, and creating curricular links within the Humanities and across divisions. The position offers the opportunity to define a new area of research and teaching, building on Dartmouth’s existing strengths in the Humanities and Computing. The field of research and teaching is open; we seek candidates with practical and/or theoretical expertise in one or several of the following disciplines in the Arts and the Humanities: visual arts, screen studies, new media, performance arts, music and sound, film, TV/Video, and literature. Expertise in computer hardware and/or software will be welcome but is not essential. The role of the Chair in Digital Humanities is intended to be broad in scope, potentially incorporating current or future initiatives in cyber-culture and the creation, performance, and critical study of digital arts, including a consideration of the socio-political and theoretical implications of new artistic technologies. The endowment for this Chair provides additional funds for projects involving research and teaching in the Digital Humanities. The successful candidate will be located in a single Dartmouth department or program, or jointly appointed to one or more departments or programs. Considerable flexibility exists regarding joint appointments, which may cross departmental or even divisional boundaries. One of the most diverse institutions of higher education in New England, Dartmouth College is an equal opportunity/ affirmative action employer and has a strong commitment to diversity. In that spirit, we are particularly interested in receiving applications from a broad spectrum of people, including women, persons of color, persons with disabilities, and veterans. The Search Committee will begin reviewing applications after October 1, 2006.

Applications will be considered until the position is filled. Please send letter of application, CV, and the names of three references

Gerd Gemunden
Chair, Search Committee in Digital Humanities Dept. of German Studies
6084 Dartmouth Hall
Dartmouth College
Hanover, NH 03755 USA

A Morning of Discussion on Electronic Literature at Maryland

Please join MITH for a morning of discussion on electronic literature. In preparation for the Electronic Literature Organization’s impending move to MITH (, two of the ELO’s directors, ALAN LIU (Professor of English, University of California Santa Barbara) and JOE TABBI (Professor of English, University of Illinois Chicago) will visit to present talks on the preservation and collecting of electronic literature, as well as a new curriculum (at Santa Barbara) to support its teaching.

The talks will take place from 9:30-12:00 on Friday, April 28 in the McKeldin Library Special Events room (#6137), University of Maryland, College Park. The schedule will be as follows:

* ALAN LIU, “Preserving Electronic Literature” (9:30-10:00)

* JOSEPH TABBI, “The Directory of Electronic Literature” (10:00-10:30)

* Discussion with Liu and Tabbi (10:30-11:00)

* Break (11:00-11:15)

* ALAN LIU, “The University of California Transliteracies Project: Research in the Technological, Social, and Cultural Practices of Online Reading” (11:15-12:00)

ALAN LIU, Professor of English at UC Santa Barbara, is one of the most accomplished theorists in the digital humanities today. He is the initiator of numerous digital projects, including the Voice of the Shuttle (, the earliest and still the largest humanities portal on the Web. His most recent book is _The Laws of Cool: Knowledge Work and the Culture of Information_ (University of Chicago Press, 2004). JOE TABBI, Professor of English at University of Illinois Chicago, is the author most recently of _Cognitive Fictions_ (University of Minnesota Press, 2002) and is the founding editor of _ebr_ or the _electronic book review_ (, which has evolved into an essential hub for writing and scholarship on new media and electronic literature.

Contact: Neil Fraistat, Acting Director, MITH (,, 301-405-5896).