CFP: MLA E-Lit Reading (11/28; 1/9/15)

E-Lit@Vancouver

Start 2015 with Electronic Literature! The Electronic Literature Organization seeks proposals for the E-Lit@Vancouver reading,  to be held 8pm, Friday, January 9, at the Rickshaw Theatre (254 E Hastings St). The reading is organized by ELO President Dene Grigar and ELO co-Vice President Sandy Baldwin. The event is free and open to the public, and is scheduled to take place during the 2015 Modern Language Association (readers are not required to attend the conference or be members of MLA, though they are required to be physically present at the reading).
Participations in the reading is open to any member of the ELO ( see http://eliterature.org​ for more information). We seek readings and performances that celebrate electronic literature in all its forms. To be considered, send a 300 word proposal, including technical requirements, and a brief biography to Sandy Baldwin at sbaldwin66 at gmail dotcom. Deadline: November 28. All submissions will be read and peer reviewed. Decisions will be announced by December 5.

Off-Site ASA E-Lit Reading (Nov 6)

Off-Site Reading Logo

 

Game Over
The Fun and Fury of Electronic Literature

An evening of poetry and digital art performances

Date: November 6, 8-9:30pm, Doheny Library, USC

The Off-Site performances of digital literature for the 2014 conference of the American Studies Association in Los Angeles.
Join us for an evening of readings of electronic literature. Bots, Apps, and more from the future of reading and writing!

Featuring: . micha cardenas, MD Coverley, Max Geiger, Samantha Gorman, Jeff Knowlton, Adam Sulzdorf-Liszkiewicz, and Brian Kim Stefans.

8pm, Doheny Library.

Location: Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study, 2nd Floor Doheny Library, USC

Organized by Leonardo Flores (UPRM) and Mark C Marino (USC)

Directions from the Westin Bonaventure
Take Metro Expo Line (toward Culver City) from Metro Center Station
See more directions here

Read more Off-Site ASA E-Lit Reading (Nov 6)

ELO-DHSI Summer Courses (June 2015)

ELO-DHSI Summer Courses (6/1-5; 6/8-12; 6/15-19 2015)

We are pleased to announce that the Electronic Literature Organization (ELO) will be partnering with the Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI) to offer opportunities for members to participate in the series of DH courses at the University of Victoria that takes place from June 1st-5th 2015, June 8th-12th 2015, and June 15th-19th 2015.

Registration for DHSI is now open. This year will see an expansion from the regular one-week Institute to three weeks of courses, in part to support those enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities at U Victoria. Participants may choose to attend one, two, or all three week-long workshops. In 2015, 40 courses ranging from old favourites to exciting first-time ventures will be offered. Each week of DHSI will include a week-long training workshop, and the core week (June 8th-12th) will also include morning colloquia, lunchtime unconferences, and Birds-of-a-Feather sessions. Throughout the institute, keynote lectures will be given by Malte Rehbein (U Passau), David Hoover (NYU), Claire Warwick (UC London), and Constance Crompton (UBC Okanagan).

Read more ELO-DHSI Summer Courses (June 2015)

CFP: ELO 2015 Bergen, Norway

UPDATED: New Deadline: Jan 7, 2015
ELO Conference PosterCall for Contributions: ELO 2015 Conference – Bergen, Norway
The End(s) of Electronic Literature

The 2015 Electronic Literature Organization conference and festival will take place August 5-7th 2015. The conference website is at: http://conference.eliterature.org. The conference will be hosted by the Bergen Electronic Literature research group at the University of Bergen, Norway with sessions at venues including the University of Bergen, Det Akademiske Kvarteret, the Bergen Public Library, the University of Bergen Arts library, and local arts venues. Bergen is Norway’s second-largest city, known as the gateway to the fjords, a festival city and cultural center with a lively and innovative arts scene.

DEADLINES

The deadline for submissions of research, workshop, and arts proposals is Jan 7, 2015.

 

CONFERENCE THEME

The theme of the 2015 Electronic Literature Organization conference and festival is “The End(s) of Electronic Literature.” This theme plays on several different meanings of “ends.” Topics the conference papers and works will explore include:

Is “electronic literature” a transitional term that will become obsolete as literary uses of computational media and devices become ubiquitous? If so, what comes after electronic literature?

Read more CFP: ELO 2015 Bergen, Norway

CFP: E-Poetry 2015: Buenos Aires

E-POETRY [ 2015 ] : BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA : NEW PATHS, NEW VOICES / NUEVAS RUTAS, NUEVAS VOCES  [ June 9-12, 2015 ]
Submissions: Jan. 7, 2015 — Early Registration: March 15, 2015

The Heart is the Capital of the Mind— / The Mind is a single State—
The Heart and the Mind together make / A single Continent—
— Emily Dickinson

DEDICATED TO THE CONCEPT THAT THERE EXISTS ONE COLLECTIVE WORLDWIDE CONTEXT FOR DIGITAL LITERATURE — not a community by necessity broken into divisions by sea or isthmus or region — and continuing its biennial calendar to enable participants time to develop work suited to the uniquely celebratory spirit of this festival and conference, E-Poetry is pleased to present its Call For Proposals for its conference in Buenos Aires, June 9-12, 2015, the first ongoing electronic literature series to be held in South America! We celebrate greater community, new voices, and new contexts!

Proposals for Scientific/Scholarly Papers (15 minutes) or Creative (Performances/Readings/Hybrid Talks  of 15 or 30 minutes) or Media Exhibitions (Installations/Video/Hybrid Works) including: (1) full name and affiliation (academic  or independent artist); (2) two-line program listing (if full description is in Spanish or Portuguese, please also include two-line program listing in English); (3) 250 word description; and (4) technical needs/precise set-up time for proposed presentation. Indicate category of submission. Conference languages: English, Spanish, and Portuguese (simultaneous translation). Of greatest interest are literary explorations, new poetics, e-lit across borders and languages, and emergent connections with Latin America. Whether scholarly, poetically inspired, or interwoven critical/artistic works, we seek your presentations and performances! Special thanks to Claudia Kozak, Local Facilitator. ALL proposals, with subject line “E-Poetry 2015 Proposal” MUST be sent to emerginglanguagepractices [at] gmail.com with a cc: to Laura Shackelford, E-POETRY [ 2015 ] Proposals Coordinator (lxsgla [at] rit.edu). Proposal Committee listed below. Updated info available at E-POETRY 2015 (http://epc.buffalo.edu/e-poetry/2015). Due to the highly competitive nature of E-Poetry, early submission is encouraged.

DEADLINE: Proposals for scientific/scholarly papers or performances/readings/hybrid talks: Jan. 7, 2015; notifications of acceptance by Feb. 15, 2015. Early registration deadline is March 15, 2015. (Note: Latin America participants, inquire about special scholarships for E-Poetry 2015 participation!)

Please see the EPC (http://epc.buffalo.edu), or the attached, for full details!

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Summer eReading: La valeur heuristique de la littérature numérique

New Scholarly text by Serge BouchardonEven as some of us return to our studies, our Summer eReading continues with this French work of scholarship by Serge Bouchardon: La valeur heuristique de la littérature numérique.

Based in Paris, Bouchardon has been a long time friend of ELO. In addition to his critical work, his creative works have been celebrated at a variety of ELO events including the recent New Media Gallery in Milwaukee.

Presentation

Literary writing with and for the computer has been around for over half a century. This literature is part of well-known genealogical lines: combinatorial writing and writing with constraints, fragmentary writing, audio and visual writing. Whether it is in the form of hyperfictions, animated poems, generative or collaborative works, digital literary creation is now flourishing, especially online.

Because it is at the intersection of literary, communication, epistemological and pedagogical issues, digital literature is a particularly fruitful object.  The heuristic value of digital literature is what allows you to question and reevaluate certain notions (author, text, narrative, materiality, figure, memory…), but  it is also what opens up avenues for the field of digital writing.

Biography

Serge Bouchardon graduated in literature from the Sorbonne University (France).  After working as a project manager in the educational software industry, he wrote his dissertation on interactive literary narrative and is currently Professor in Communication Sciences at the University of Technology of Compiegne (France). His research focuses on digital creation, in particular digital literature.

As an author, he is interested in the unveiling of interactivity. The creation Loss of Grasp (http://lossofgrasp.com/) won the New Media Writing Prize 2011.

Research: http://www.utc.fr/~bouchard/
Creation: http://www.sergebouchardon.com/

 

 

Call for Submission: E-lit at SLSA14

Call for submissions
Dig-Lit Flow: Juried Reading at SLSA 2014
Saturday 4pm, October 11, 2014
Dallas, Texas
Deadline: Sept. 12, 2014

Electronic literature brings its own unusual flows to the world of letters.  Calling for submissions for a reading of digital lit that demonstrates the spectacular range of this innovative genre.

The Society for Literature Science and the Arts has been a long-standing center for scholarship on electronic literature.  This year, electronic literature will be showcased in a juried showcase at the 2014 SLSA conference in Dallas, Texas.  The event is co-sponsored by the Electronic Literature Organization (http://eliterature.org).

Potential genres include but are not limited to: electronic poetry, interactive narrative, literary video games, netprov,  locative narrative, and literary generators.

Performances are limited to 10 minutes.

Submit 250-300-word description and links to markcmarino at gmail.com (Subject: elit at SLSA14).  Descriptions should emphasize the performative nature of the presentation. Proposals should include the title and a short description of the work (including any links to your material), a plan for presentation, technology requirements, and a short (50 words) bio for each participant. Available technology will be audio, projector, and wifi.

Deadline: Sept. 15, 2014

Note: All participants must register for the SLSA conference and must be in attendance at the reading.  No remote presentations will be accepted.

For more information, please write markcmarino at gmail

Announcing the ELC3

Call for Submissions

The Electronic Literature Organization (ELO) is now seeking submissions and nominations for Volume 3 of the Electronic Literature Collection. ELO was founded in 1999 and has released two collections, in 2006 and 2011The third volume is slated for publication in 2016 and will continue to archive outstanding examples of electronic literature from an international community of practitioners. The goal of this volume is to represent the current state of electronic literature and to archive historically significant works from earlier generations.

From hypertext and kinetic poetry to ARGs and Twitter bots, we invite submissions from a wide range of fields. Electronic literature (or e-lit) thrives at the intersection of digital media and textuality. ELO offers a broad definition of e-lit as “works with important literary aspects that take advantage of the capabilities and contexts provided by the stand-alone or networked computer” (http://eliterature.org/what-is-e-lit/). For examples of the range of writing previously collected, Volume 1 and 2 are available at http://collection.eliterature.org. These earlier volumes were published under a Creative Commons license, distributed in physical storage media, and available open-access through a website. The ELC3 will follow a similar format.

Please submit your works and nominations online using this form, also embedded below.  You may contact the editorial collective directly at: elcvol3 at g mail.

Entries in any language are welcome.

Deadline: November 5, 2014

http://eliterature.org/elc3/

Summer eReading: Analyzing Digital Fiction

Analyzing Digital FictionOur Summer eReading series resumes with a scholalry work that examines many of forms of electronic literature. Analyzing Digital Fiction (Routledge 2014), edited by Alice Bell, Astrid Ensslin, and Hans Rustad, features readings from an international group of scholars on an equally international collection of works.

Collected authors, in addition to the editors, include: Serge Bouchardon, David Ciccoricco, Isabell Klaiber, Alexandra Saemmer, Roberto Simanowski, Bronwen Thomas, and Susana Tosca.   Finnish scholar Raine Koskimaa says, “This book provides the reader with powerful tools to analyze and understand the emerging fictions of digital culture.” It will make a good companion to the diverse works of electronic narrative that will also be featured in our summer eReading!

From the Publisher:

Analyzing Digital Fiction offers a collection of pioneering analyses based on replicable methodological frameworks. It offers analyses of digital works that have so far received little or no analytical attention and profiles replicable methodologies which can be used in the analyses of other digital fictions. Chapters include analyses of hypertext fiction, Flash fiction, Twitter fiction and videogames with approaches taken from narratology, stylistics, semiotics and ludology. Essays propose ways in which digital environments can expand, challenge and test the limits of literary theories which have, until recently, predominantly been based on models and analyses of print texts.

Announcing winners of 1st Coover & Hayles Awards!

ELO is proud to announce the first winners of the “The N. Katherine Hayles Award for Criticism of Electronic Literature” and “The Robert Coover Award for a Work of Electronic Literature,” two new annual awards in the field.  Designed to draw attention to the rising tide in this area, these awards awards mark a significant new initiative in ELO’s support of scholarship and art in the world of digital literature.

The winner of the Coover award is Jason Edward Lewis for his work, “Vital to the General Public Welfare” (The PoEMM Cycle), and the winner of the Hayles Award is Johannes Heldén & Håkan Jonson for their work, Evolution. Honorary Mention for the Coover Award goes to Aaron Reed for “18 Cadence.”  Honorary Mention for the Hayles Award goes Calum Rodger for “Reading the Drones: Working Towards a Critical Tradition of Interactive Poetry Generation.”  Below is the official announcement of the awards.

“The Robert Coover Award for a Work of Electronic Literature”

“The Robert Coover Award for a Work of Electronic Literature” saw 18 submissions from Spain, the US, Australia, Peru, the UK, Sweden, Italy, and Brazil. The Criteria Workgroup that developed the Submission Guidelines for the Award included Judy Malloy, Jennifer Ley, Laura Zaylea, and Brian Kim Stefans. The Jury consisted of Bobby Arellano, Christine Wilks, Patrick LeMieux, and Luciana Gattass.

The winner of this award is Jason Edward Lewis for his work, “Vital to the General Public Welfare” (The PoEMM Cycle).

This work is, according to one Jurist, “[i]n its entirety . . . very impressive and most enjoyable to read. There’s a marvellous range of different modalities combined with touch interaction, used to great poetic, narrative and thematic effect. . . . These works are at the cutting edge of electronic literature and stand out in the way they thoroughly embrace interactive reading in the multi-touch, multi-screen present and future.” Another wrote, “This is serious poetry and beautifully designed in an ambitious project cycle.”

Honorary Mention goes to Aaron Reed for “18 Cadence.”

One Jurist remarked that “’18 Cadence” “combines interactive fiction with a memetic, cut-and-paste interface that allows reader and player to become the maker of their own microstories. ‘18 Cadence’ is a beautifully designed, complex reading experience not only of a hundred years of one house, but of those fictions produced by other readers.”  Another wrote, “Engaging story, intentionally minimalist, encouraged discovery as well as play in a multi-modal synchronous interface.”

“The Robert Coover Award for a Work of Electronic Literature” is an award given for the best work of electronic literature of any length or genre. Bestowed by the Electronic Literature Organization and funded through a generous donation from supporters and members of the ELO, this $1000 annual prize aims to recognize creative excellence. The prize comes with a plaque showing the name of the winner and an acknowledgement of the achievement, and a one-year membership in the Electronic Literature Organization at the Associate Level.

 

“The N. Katherine Hayles Award for Criticism of Electronic Literature”

 

“The N. Katherine Hayles Award for Criticism of Electronic Literature” saw 9 submissions, consisting of four books and five articles by scholars from the UK, Canada, Sweden, Germany, Portugal, and Scotland.  The Criteria Workgroup that created the Submission Guidelines for the award included Matt Kirschenbaum, Chris Funkhouser, and Rita RaleyThe Jury consisted of Jill Walker, Anastasia Salter, Pat Jagoda, and Stephanie Boluk.

The Winner of this award is Johannes Heldén & Håkan Jonson for their work, Evolution.

“Evolution” by Johannes Heldén & Håkan Jonson, wrote one Jurist, “an interesting critical-creative experiment. . . . [that] captures the boundary crossing spirit of the ELO.” Another wrote that “Evolution” “is both a work of literature and multi-voiced, multi-modal criticism.” Another wrote that “this collection of seven short critical responses to the generative poem Evolution by Johannes Heldén and Håkan Jonson plays with the genre of criticism by enclosing the essays within over 200 pages of code. . . .  Each of the essays in this collection is poetic and thought-provoking in its own way. . . .  The rest of the book is left to the code itself, and to logs of its output. Perhaps the book was written, compiled, designed by Evolution itself. Even the table of contents looks like computer code, laid out the way that a piece of software might prefer.  I’m ranking this book first on my list because of its challenges to the form of criticism – there is a creativity and unexpectedness in the way that these responses to the text are presented that is very engaging and that contributes to the work and to the field in general.”

Honorary Mention goes to Calum Rodger for “Reading the Drones: Working Towards a Critical Tradition of Interactive Poetry Generation.”

One Jurist wrote that “this essay offers an extremely clear and useful intervention into why we should study Interactive Poetry Generation in literary criticism.” Another said that it “combines a wide-ranging knowledge of conceptual poetry with computation” and “offers many lucid insights in an under-examined field of literary and media practice.”

“The N. Katherine Hayles Award for Criticism of Electronic Literature” is an award given for the best work of criticism, of any length, on the topic of electronic literature. Bestowed by the Electronic Literature Organization and funded through a generous donation from N. Katherine Hayles and others, this $1000 annual prize aims to recognize excellence in the field. The prize comes with a plaque showing the name of the winner and an acknowledgement of the achievement, and a one-year membership in the Electronic Literature Organization at the Associate Level.

Read more Announcing winners of 1st Coover & Hayles Awards!