Extension: CFP: Visionary Landscapes (12/16, 5/29-6/1)

The deadline for Visionary Landscapes: Electronic Literature Organization 2008 Conference has been extended to December 16, 2007.

The conference takes place from May 29-June 1, 2008 at Washington State University Vancouver in lovely Vancouver, WA. It is sponsored by both the Electronic Literature Organization and WSUV. Speakers include Mark Amerika, Sue Thomas, and John Cayley. A Media Arts Show will be held in conjunction with the conference and will feature art such as digital sculpture, net art, multimedia installations and performances, electronic music, and the like. Workshops in audio production and reading elit are also scheduled.

According to conference co-chair, Dene Grigar,

It should prove to be an interesting weekend for anyone involved in digital media projection, scholarship, and teaching.

Graduate Program in Literary Arts at Brown University

John Cayley reminds interested potential candidates that Brown’s prestigious Graduate Program in Literary Arts – two years (usually all-found) leading to an MFA – is currently accepting one applicant per year as an Electronic Writer (one of c. 14 per annum; the others apply for 5 fiction, 5 poetry and 3 play-writing places; past ‘electronic’ incumbents are: Noah Wardrip-Fruin, Talan Memmott, William Gillespie, Brian Kim Stefans, Daniel Howe; Aya Karpinska is in her second year, and Justin Katko started this Fall). This is a great opportunity for a practitioner to develop and to achieve a widely-recognised academic qualification (a ‘terminal degree’ they sometimes call it here: taken to be a Good Thing). The application deadline for next Fall’s intake is December 15. Full details on the Literary Arts Programs web site:

New on the Electronic Book Review: Electropoetics

In the latest selection from the Electronic Book Review, Associate Editor Lori Emerson brings together both critics and creators of electronic poetry, some of whom established themselves at the very start and many more who are recent entrants in the field of electronic literature. Essays on print poetry as well as born digital poetry help to situate the field in both a trans-disciplinary and trans-national context.

The collection (more than twenty essays in all) includes three review-essays on the Electronic Literature Collection (volume 1), published by the ELO: “How to Think (with) Thinkertoys” by Adalaide Morris; “Letters That Matter” by John Zuern; and “Electronic Literature circa WWW (and Before)” by Chris Funkhouser. New essays on and by Douglas Barbour, Michael Barrett, Greg Betts, Christof Bruno, Charles Bernstein, Stephen Cain, Robert Creeley, Clayton Eshleman, Alan Fisher, Eduardo Kac, Hugh Kenner, Walter Benn Michaels, Jay Murphy, Janet Neigh, Soren Pold, Christopher Nolan, Jaishree Odin, Tom Raworth, Maggie O’Sullivan, Stephanie Strickland, Angela Szczepaniak, Steve Tomasula, and Eugene Thacker.

“Reading Digital Literature” at Brown University, October 4-7

If you are near Brown University this week from October 4-7, consider attending “Reading Digital Literature,” a colloquium organized by Roberto Simanowski. A description and the website follow.

A curtain of tiny screens with live quotations from Internet chat; stories generated by computer programs; narratives generated by their readers; words that disappear; texts that reveal themselves depending on their readers’ position. How shall we read such moving letters? How do we catch their meanings? How can they make us feel? The conference “Reading Digital Literature” brings together ten specialists from the USA and Europe to search for answers through in-depth analyses.

For details on the agenda, concept, etc., please visit: Reading Digital Literature

Brown appoints John Cayley to teach electronic writing

Brown’s Literary Arts Program welcomes John Cayley to the faculty as a senior visiting professor. In this position, Cayley will teach electronic writing, including CaveWriting, for a minimum of five years.

Cayley has stated that as a result of this appointment, part of his role will be to ask difficult questions to help push work in the field further. “What will or will not emerge as a widely recognized genre of writing from all the ephemeral new forms and experiments that proliferate across the Net and on the screens of our electronic familiars? How will all this change our notion of what writing is and how writing is made? Writing in and for a 3-D virtual world? It’s here now, and it will come,” says Cayley.

To learn more about Cayley’s work, visit:http://www.shadoof.net

Call for Submissions–deadline October 19, 2007

The New River is a journal of digital writing and art, created and edited by Ed Falco. The managing editors are graduate students from Virginia Tech’s MFA Creative Writing Program. We are interested in receiving submissions of original and unpublished digital writing and art.
To submit to The New River, just send a URL to our managing editor, Lauren Goldstein (writer@vt.edu), where we can find and review your work. If accepted, you will be asked to upload all files to our server so we can host it locally. If you have any questions, feel free to email us. Send all inquiries and submissions to newriver@vt.edu.
To view the Spring 2007 issue, as well as archives, visit us at

Purple Blurb, a New Digital Reading Series at MIT

This Fall, Purple Blurb, a new reading series for digital writing, is beginning in Cambridge at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The series is sponsored by the MIT programs in Writing and Humanistic Studies and Comparative Media Studies along with local arts organization Turbulence and the Electronic Literature Organization. The series features readings and presentations by digital writers of all sorts – poets, fiction writers, writers of nonfiction and criticism, and others engaged in language, narrative, and letters on the computer. The readings will start at 6pm at MIT in 14N–233 (second floor of building 14, in the wing that is across the courtyard from the Hayden Library). A flyer for the series lists the four events for this Fall, which are presentations by:

September 18
Robert KendallClues, Faith, Logozoa, Pieces

October 16
Vika ZafrinRolandHT, Words’ End

November 13
Barbara BarryMindful Documentary, One Degree Narratives

December 4
Andrew PlotkinShade, So Far, The Dreamhold, Delightful Wallpaper

Contact Nick Montfort (username nickm, domain nickm.com) if you have any questions about the series.

CFP for Visionary Landscapes: Electronic Literature Organization 2008 Conference

Visionary Landscapes: Electronic Literature Organization 2008 Conference

Thursday, May 29-Sunday, June 1, 2008
Vancouver, Washington

Sponsored by Washington State University Vancouver & the Electronic Literature Organization

Dene Grigar & John Barber, Co-Chairs

Producing a work of electronic literature entails not only practice in the literary arts but sometimes also the visual, sonic, and the performative arts; knowledge of computing devices and software programs; and experience in collaboration, interdisciplinarity, and hybridity. In short, electronic literature requires its artists to see beyond traditional approaches and sensibilities into what best can be described as visionary landscapes where, as Mark Amerika puts it, artists “celebrate an interdisciplinary practice from a literary and writerly perspective that allows for other kinds of practice-based art-research and knowledge sharing.”

To forward the thinking about new approaches and sensibilities in the media arts, The Electronic Literature Organization and Washington State University Vancouver’s Digital Technology and Culture program are inviting submissions to the Electronic Literature Organization 2008 Conference to be held from May 29 to June 1, 2008 in Vancouver, Washington.

“Visionary Landscapes: Electronic Literature Organization 2008 Conference” is interested in papers that explore forms of digital media that utilize images, sound, movement, and user interaction as well as––or in lieu of––words and that explore how we read, curate, and critique such works. Topics may include:

• New, non-screen, environments for presenting multimedia writing and/or electronic literature
• Research labs and new media projects
• Strategies for reading electronic literary works
• Curating digital art
• Innovative approaches to critiquing electronic literature
• Emerging technologies for the production of multimedia writing and/or electronic literature
• Building audience for new media literary works and writing
• Digital, literary performances
• Publishing for print or electronic media connecting literature and the arts through common archiving and metatag strategies
• Artistic methods of composition used in intermedia storytelling(improvisation, collaboration, sample and remix, postproduction art, codework, hactivism, etc.

In conjunction with the three-day conference, there will be a juried Media Arts Show. Along with prizes for the most notable work, selected artists will be awarded bursaries to attend the conference featured at the show. Submission guidelines will be posted beginning August 15, 2007 on the conference website.

The keynote speaker is internationally renowned new media artist and writer, Mark Amerika, named a “Time Magazine 100 Innovator.” His artwork has been exhibited at the Whitney Biennial, the ICA in London, the Walker Art Center, and the Denver Art Museum and has been the topic of four retrospectives. Amerika is also the author of many books, including his recently published collection of artist writings entitled META/DATA: A Digital Poetics (The MIT Press), founder of the Alt-X Network, and publisher of the electronic book review. He currently holds the position of Professor of Art and Art History at the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Deadline for Submissions for Presentations: November, 30, 2007
Notification of Acceptance: December 30, 2007

Vancouver, Washington, located in the Pacific Northwest just across the Columbia River from Portland, OR, is about a six hour drive south of Vancouver, Canada and three hours south of Seattle, Washington. The conference day events will take place at Washington State University Vancouver, a Tier One research Institution built in the foothills of the Cascade Mountains with views of Mt. Hood and Mt. Saint Helens. The official conference hotel is the Hilton Vancouver located in downtown Vancouver, Washington with easy access to restaurants, bars, and evening conference events. Special rates have been negotiated for conference attendees. A conference shuttle will take attendees to and from the campus daily. The recommended airport is PDX at Portland, which is about a seven minute drive to downtown Vancouver, WA.

The cost of the conference is $150; graduate students and non-affiliated artists pay only $100. Conference registration covers access to all events, the reception, some meals, and shuttle transportation.

For more information, contact Dene Grigar at Grigar@vancouver.wsu.edu.

The Chronicle of Higher Education Covers ELO Open Mic & Mouse

The Chronicle of Higher Education has devoted three pieces to the ELO/MITH Open Mic & Mouse event that was held as a kick-off to the Electronic Literature Symposium that was held at the University of Maryland in early May.

Click here for an article covering the event. Below the lead picture, you’ll find a link to the video story. And, on the right-hand side of the screen, under “Related Material,” you’ll see a link for an audio interview with N. Katherine Hayles.

Postdoctoral Research Position at UCSD

University of California, San Diego (UCSD)

We are currently recruiting for a Postdoctoral Researcher to join a
new Software Studies initiative at UCSD. The researcher will work
with Dr. Lev Manovich (Professor, Visual Arts) and Dr. Noah
Wardrip-Fruin (Assistant Professor, Communication), playing a key
role in all projects and field-building activities.

The goals of Software Studies initiative at UCSD are:

* to foster research and develop models and tools for the study
of software from the perspectives of cultural criticism, the
humanities, and the social sciences;
* to help establish a new field of “software studies” that will
complement existing research in cyberculture and new media;
* to develop projects that will demonstrate how next generation
cyberinfrastructure can be used by humanists, social scientists, and
cultural practitioners.

For an introduction to “software studies,” see: Software Studies
, Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam, February 2006.


The position is full time (40 hrs/week). The initial appointment is
for 1 year, with the possibility for renewal. The position comes with
full benefits covered by UCSD. The starting salary range is USD 38,000 – 42,000. The selected candidate can start immediately.

Required qualifications:

* a PhD in the humanities, social sciences, information science,
or related interdisciplinary area that has been completed and
defended before starting the position at UCSD;
* broad understanding of contemporary global culture and
familiarity with current debates in one or more cultural fields;
* familiarity with current IT developments; understanding of Web
2.0 concepts and social media optimization;
* the ability to write engaging and jargon-free texts that are
accessible to diverse global audiences.

Desired qualifications:

* experience installing and using research-oriented software
tools (e.g., data mining tools, GIS packages, visualization
technologies, databases, and/or other software used in digital
* understanding of programming language and system integration
concepts; practical experience with computer programming or scripting;
* previous experience working with computer scientists on joint projects;
* previous research projects and/or publications which address
software from the perspectives of the humanities, social sciences, or
cultural criticism (for example: the history of software; studies of
software use in the sciences, cultural industries, and other fields;
the analysis of software structures and code).

This position is supported by the UCSD Division of the California
Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (Calit2)
and the Center for Research in Computing and the Arts (CRCA). Housing
over 900 faculty, graduate students, and staff researchers, Calit2 is
developing next-generation cyberinfrastructure tools with a
particular focus on multidisciplinary collaboration.

Calit2 is located on the UCSD campus, which is internationally
renowned as a place for study and research in digital art, computer
music, and digital theory. Between the departments of Visual Arts,
Music, and Communication, there are close to 30 full-time faculty
working in these areas.

The technical facilities and staff support for research in digital
media on the UCSD campus are among the best in the world. They
include a number of state-of-the-art research labs and performance
spaces which provide both current and next-generation tools for
immersive visualization, multi-channel audio spatialization, digital
cinema, motion capture, interactive performance, 3-D fabrication, and
computer gaming research. The UCSD campus also houses the San Diego
Supercomputing Center which provides facilities for petascale
computing, data storage, and visualization.

The position is open until filled, but application review will begin
after June 10th, 2007. For priority consideration, candidates are
encouraged to apply before this date. Applicants should send a
current CV with cover letter to Helena Bristow
with subject line “Application for Software Studies Postdoc Position.”

Manovich and Wardrip-Fruin will be available for preliminary
interviews at the 2007 Digital Humanities conference during the first
week of June, 2007. Please indicate whether you will be attending DH ’07 in your application.

For further information, please contact:

Helena Bristow
Administrative Director
Center for Research in Computing and the Arts